Why crane’s Country Store is still in business

Posted January 06, 2018 08:01:53After more than three decades of operation, the crane store in Darla Crane Alley has closed.

The closure is part of a plan to replace the building with a condominium tower, according to the store’s owner, Joe Fong.

“We are very sad to have to shut it down,” said Fong, who owns the Darla crane store.

“This is a great community that we are a part of.

There are no kids, no animals, no pets, nothing. “

It was very unfortunate for everybody.

There are no kids, no animals, no pets, nothing.

It was a sad day for everyone.”

Fong said the crane’s building was demolished to make way for a condo tower.

“A lot of the older stuff was gone,” Fong told CBC News in an interview.

“There was nothing in there.

It just happened to get torn down.” “

The other stuff that was in there was very important to us.

It just happened to get torn down.”

Darla is a residential area in southwest Calgary that sits at the junction of two highways.

Fong has been running a local construction company, Crane & Associates, for the past 20 years.

He said it is difficult to find work when there is a crane on site.

“Everybody’s looking for work,” he said.

“They’re in such a dangerous environment, the whole environment, all the construction and everything. “

“People come in here and they don’t know the dangers that they’re going into.” “

Fongs father, who was born in China, was one of three brothers and five sisters who lived in Darlala when he was a child. “

People come in here and they don’t know the dangers that they’re going into.”

Fongs father, who was born in China, was one of three brothers and five sisters who lived in Darlala when he was a child.

Fongs grandfather, who had worked in construction for the Calgary Expos in the 1940s, died of a heart attack at age 65.

FONG’S BUSINESS TO BEGIN AUCTION OF CLOTHING FOR CLINTON Clinton is scheduled to visit Darla in the coming days.

The former U.S. President will be on hand for an auction of clothes that Fong says he would wear in his first White House bid.

Fings website says that if he were to win the presidency, he would donate his collection to a charity that helps veterans.

Fools advice Fong is not buying it.

“If I had to buy a shirt from someone and I’m going to be in a position where I’m not going to wear it in a couple of weeks, it wouldn’t make any sense for me to buy that,” he told CBC’s Calgary Eyeopener.

That’s a bad idea.” “

You know what I mean?

That’s a bad idea.”

FONG WILL PAY TO CARRY OUT THE PLAN If he were elected, Fong plans to donate the clothes he would want to wear in the White House to a local veterans’ charity.

He also said that if the election were held today, he is confident he would get elected.

“You can be the first president of the United States and you’re going to have the best chance at being elected if you have the support of the veterans, the people that served,” Fongs website says.

FONTS TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT THE COUNTRY CLOSURE A local activist group is asking Fong to take immediate action to prevent the closure.

The group is calling on him to keep the doors of the Darlla Crane Store open, so it can be renovated.

“Let’s start the construction on a new crane store, so the community can get back to building more,” said Doug Fong with the Canadian Centre for International Policy.

“In addition, let’s give the city some help to help them out with the building.”

FONSON SAYS HE IS NOT GOING TO BE A PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES Fongs father and grandfather both served in the U.P.C.F.M.F., the largest branch of the U-2, has been flying non-stop over Darlana and other Canadian cities since the 1950s.

It has been an important part of the community since World War II, when it first flew over the city.

The organization flew more than 3,000 missions over Canada in the 1960s and 1970s, flying from a small airstrip near the Darlington bridge in the north to a larger one near the border with Mexico.

In 1974, FONSOFF was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the highest military award.

Fonson is a veteran of more than a dozen conflicts, including the Korean War and Vietnam, and says he believes